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Multiple-Choice Questions

Non-Linear Thinking

Posted by David Gobeil on

Please read the Post about Linear Thinking first. A non-linear thinker (NLT) would approach it differently. An NLT would glance at the root of the question to see what kind of information is included, but assume that it is all irrelevant until proven otherwise. There is a couple, someone’s nephews and some money. Looking at the rest of the question, it is a combination question. The choices include all of the statements and none of the statements is included in all of the choices. All of the statements are in play. An NLT would look at the statements and try...

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Linear Thinking

Posted by David Gobeil on

Throughout your education, you probably were successful by doing step 1, and then step 2, then step 3. Most of the world is A B C D and 1 2 3 4, not A D C B and 1 4 3 2. Most candidates practice this linear thinking. Marvin and Angela Smithers are professionals in their mid-40s. They have no children of their own, but dote on Angela’s sister’s two children, Samuel and Mariner. Samuel is 12 years of age and attending Upper Canada College. Mariner is 21 years of age and attending Queen’s University for another four years. The...

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Recommendation Questions

Posted by David Gobeil on

You need to approach a collection question differently than a recommendation question. You have answered hundreds of collection questions, not so many recommendation questions.  When you are faced with a recommendation question, keep in mind that considering the alternatives requires a lot of thought and therefore time. The question will offer at least two very reasonable alternatives. If the question is part of a case study, you will have to search five or six pages of background looking for information.  “The tricky part of the exam was to find the BEST answer. The exam would have two similar answers and...

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Allocation by Financial Planning Functions

Posted by David Gobeil on

For the CFP Competency Profile, the FPSC has defined three financial planning functions: Collection, Analysis and Recommendations. In preparing to pass your Exam, it helps if you understand the distinctions between collection, analysis and recommendations.   Collection involves collecting the information required to develop a financial plan.  Collection goes beyond the traditional definition. In the CFP Competency Profile, collection involves the gathering of information and the identification of facts, which may include making required calculations and preparing information in such a way as to enable analysis.  The following question involves collection: On June 30 of last year, Maha and Jasdeep, who had...

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Gobeil's Collection of 1,000 Questions™

Posted by David Gobeil on

Today, the questions on the AFP and CFP Examinations are not as difficult as those on the CFP Examination of the old program. As a result, some of the questions in our Collection of 1,000 Questions are more difficult than you will find on your exam.  When this first became apparent, we asked our customers whether we should dumb down the questions to the current level of the AFP and CFP examinations. The overwhelming response was, “No, if I can handle your stuff, I can handle the exam that I'm writing.”  However, there was some criticism about the difficulty of...

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